No Victory in Government’s Re-Working of Canada Summer Jobs Application

Toronto, ON December 7, 2018 – The Catholic Civil Rights League (CCRL) responded today to the revised Canada Summer Jobs (CSJ) application process, as announced by federal Labour minister Patty Hajdu. In brief, the new application process remains sadly deficient. The government has moved from an attestation requirement, or forced speech, by having to check a box in support of its views on “reproductive health”, which included unfettered access to abortion at all stages or its views on gender ideology, to a new requirement. It now seeks applicants to confirm that it will not engage in certain “proposed activities” in respect of otherwise legitimate beliefs with which the current government disagrees. The Minister’s new demands continue a suppression of viewpoints not shared by the government, for which funding will continue to be denied to groups that disagree. The federal Liberals are effectively establishing a “bubble zone” to prevent funding to organizations who do not share its unfettered pro-abortion position. The government maintains a false impression that there is a “right to safe and legal abortion”. It does not exist as part of either the Charter of Rights and Freedoms or in case law. While Labour minister Patty Hajdu proposed to accommodate faith-based groups, that accommodation effectively shuts out their core positions as unacceptable. This is no victory for the unborn. The government has simply changed the eligibility criteria so that organizations will be denied funding if they stand for prolife positions. The new wording of the 2019 application makes clear that grants will not be allocated if used to “undermine or restrict the exercise of rights legally protected in Canada.”...

The CCRL will Intervene at the Ontario Court of Appeal in Physicians’ Conscience Rights Case

Toronto, ON November 15, 2018 – The Catholic Civil Rights League (CCRL) is pleased to announce that on October 1 our application to intervene in the appeal of the Ontario Divisional Court decision in the case CMDS et al v. CPSO was accepted. This case concerns the conscience and religious rights of Ontario doctors who refuse to participate in morally objectionable procedures, such as euthanasia or abortion. The College of Physicians and Surgeons of Ontario (CPSO) stipulated an “effective referral” regime requiring that they ensure provision of such services by another doctor, which we argue makes them complicit in the provision of the objectionable procedure. On November 13, our factum, prepared in conjunction with the Faith and Freedom Alliance (FFA) and the Protection of Conscience Project was submitted. Click here to view it. The League’s submission is focused on what has been a relatively ignored provision of the Charter, freedom of conscience, as distinct from freedom of religion, for which the appellants and other groups are focused. About the CCRL Catholic Civil Rights League (CCRL) (www.ccrl.ca) assists in creating conditions within which Catholic teachings can be better understood, cooperates with other organizations in defending civil rights in Canada, and opposes defamation and discrimination against Catholics on the basis of their beliefs. The CCRL was founded in 1985 as an independent lay organization with a large nationwide membership base. The CCRL is a Canadian non-profit organization entirely supported by the generosity of its members. To donate to the CCRL, please click here. For further information: Christian Domenic Elia, PhD CCRL Executive Director 416-466-8244 @CCRLtweets  ...

Trinity Western University Drops the Mandatory Requirement of the Community Covenant

Toronto, ON August 16, 2018 – The Catholic Civil Rights League (CCRL) acknowledges the Trinity Western University (TWU) decision to no longer require students to sign its Community Covenant as an inevitable compromise that removes a point of contention that will now hopefully lead to the actual pursuit of a Christian law school. The TWU board of governors released the following statement effective August 9 In furtherance of our desire to maintain TWU as a thriving community of Christian believers that is inclusive of all students wishing to learn from a Christian viewpoint and underlying philosophy, the Community Covenant will no longer be mandatory as of the 2018-19 academic year with respect to admission of students to, or continuation of students at, the University. Robert G. Kuhn, president of TWU, stated that TWU, “will remain a Biblically-based, mission-focused, academically excellent University, fully committed to our foundational evangelical Christian principles.” He noted that staff and faculty would still be required to comply with the Community Covenant. The League notes that the change to the TWU policy comes following the 7-2 decision of the Supreme Court on June 15, upholding decisions of two law societies in refusing accreditation of future TWU law school graduates, based on the Community Covenant’s assertions on traditional marriage. It is hoped that TWU will proceed eventually with its application to open a law school, which will serve both Christian students and other stakeholders, by infusing the study of law with Christian witness, as in other professional faculties at TWU. The addition of law school focused on pro bono and smaller legal practice environments would fill a...

The CCRL Files Submission to Health Canada’s Public Consultation on Palliative Care

Toronto, ON July 17, 2018 – The Catholic Civil Rights League filed a submission today with Health Canada in response to their public consultation “a framework for palliative care in Canada”. According to the federal government this framework “will help support improved access to palliative care and will provide a useful reference point across jurisdictions to help identify opportunities, address gaps, and share promising practices”. Our complete submission is as follows: A Framework for Palliative Care – Submission of the Catholic Civil Rights League (CCRL) The Catholic Civil Rights League (CCRL) advocates in support of law and policy compatible with a Christian and reasoned understanding of human nature and the common good, and in particular, law and policy that promotes fundamental Christian morals and values, including the sanctity of life and respect for human dignity. Palliative Care Remains Limited as Assisted Suicide and Euthanasia Expands Thank you for the opportunity to make the following submission. The CCRL has previously argued that the regime of assisted suicide enshrined in law by the Liberal government had failed to address or take into account the inadequacy of palliative care as a treatment option in Canada. Prior to assisted suicide and euthanasia several studies indicated the crisis in Canada regarding the lack of comprehensive palliative care. For example, according to a study in 2007, only 16% to 30% of Canadians who died in that decade had access to hospice based palliative and end-of-life care services – depending on where they lived in Canada, according to the Canadian Institute for Health Information, Health Care Use at the End of Life in Western Canada (Ottawa:...

An Easter Message from CCRL President Phil Horgan

TORONTO, ON April 2, 2018 – Please accept the CCRL’s very best for a joyous Easter. Christ is risen! Truly, He is risen! Inspiration for the journey of the next 50 days, and thereafter, can come from the encounter with Jesus on the road to Emmaus. While only a short reference in Mark 16:12-13, the story of that encounter in Luke 24:13-35 later in the day of Easter Sunday holds much to contemplate. We, as disciples, need to be open to the word of God in our midst: “Were not our hearts burning within us while he talked with us on the road and opened the Scriptures to us?” Ultimately, we encounter Jesus in the sacraments – as in the Eucharist, with the disciples at Emmaus, or the parallel story of the encounter with the eunuch by Philip, resulting in his baptism. His presence changes us, and encourages the disciples to be more hospitable, “Stay with us”. After the encounter, the disciples return to Jerusalem, in a missionary zeal, where Christ appears to the apostles gathered there. In some cases, our zeal needs to be incorporated within our own homes, within our own extended families, or within our own parish communities. We may then be better suited to take on the encounter with the broader society with the zeal found in the encounter with the risen Christ. Let us find that time with our risen Lord, and be ambassadors of the joy of His victory over death. Phil Horgan, CCRL President   About the CCRL Catholic Civil Rights League (CCRL) (www.ccrl.ca) assists in creating conditions within which Catholic teachings...

CCRL Petition Against Demands for Ideological Conformity, “Just check the box!”

TORONTO, ON March 2, 2018 – The Catholic Civil Rights League (CCRL) has previously raised the issue of the new demand from the federal government to require an “attestation” or commitment from charities, non-profit organizations and small businesses applying for Canada Summer Jobs (CSJ) grants to affirm that the job and the organization’s core mandate respect and adhere to support for gender fluidity and support for abortion. The government’s employment minister said it’s no big deal to “just check the box”, even if you do believe that the preborn child is a human being worthy of protection in law. Prime Minister Justin Trudeau has previously disallowed prolife candidates from running for the Liberal party. Recently, he described objections to such attestation demands as a mere “kerfuffle”, and that Canadian groups who believed in the sanctity of human life are “not in line with where we are as a government and quite frankly where we are as a society.” Mr. Trudeau was directly referring to observant Catholics and all prolife Canadians with those words. So, what’s the big deal? Is checking a box really the end of our cherished freedoms? People from Eastern Europe, China, and many other regions intimately know what the imposition of statist norms has meant. It was often the basis of their immigration to Canada, which was recognized as being a free country. Those more inclined to watch a film should see Martin Scorsese’s 2016 film “Silence”, to learn of the oppression imposed on Jesuit missionaries in Japan in the 17th century. They were forced to denounce their faith, or see their congregations martyred. One might...